Does your training matter? (Week 2)

 

Training Matters1

In Week 1 we set out to define the criteria for what matters to the organisation. This is how we are able to determine whether our training really matters. The four key criteria we identified last week were:

1. The efficiency of the training function

2. Key performance indicators for the organisation

3. Return on training investment

4. The organisation’s psychological capital

In Week 2, we start to look at the efficiency of the training function. As with any other function within the organisation, we need our KPIs in place and equally importantly are expounding the values of the organisation as part of every training intervention. What should be on your training KPI agenda?

You will need to choose the most appropriate, however, here are some thoughts:

– the types of learning available (diversity of workforce .v. diversity of your training offer)

– take up of opportunities (measure diversity of workforce .v. diversity of your training offer)

– comparison of types of training available against organisational KPIs

– the actual spend on training compared with data about spending patterns from other organisations

– training days per employee

– off-the-job training days

– training spend as a % of salary bill

– % of staff with PDPs (or career development plans)

– an organisational skills profile .v. KPIs

– an organisational qualifications profile against KPIs

– % staff deemed competent

– % of internal promotions/appointments

– qualitative assessment data from focus groups/managers etc.

– succession planning or career planning data (how many people prepared for next career move)

Week 3, we will consider the link between organisational KPIs and training interventions.

 

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Does your training matter?

 Training Matters1

In answer to the question “does your training matter”, its vital for us to identify what matters to the organisation.  From CIPD research and from our own experiences, we set about to define what matters to the organisation and hence look at the key criteria for defining whether your training matters.

As previously mentioned, by definition the word “training” encompasses learning, training & development.

Over the next four weeks we will set out to define the criteria for what matters to the organisation under four headings:

1. The efficiency of the training function

2. Key performance indicators for the organisation

3. Return on training investment

4. The organisation’s psychological capital

Next week, the efficiency within the training function.

A Training Needs Analysis – at Individual Level

 

 

The IIP framework offers a staged approach for producing the plan as follows:

1. The Team Manager and the individual review potential learning & development priorities by striking a right balance between organisational and individual development needs. Also they should consider appropriate development in the context of the team’s needs.

2. Individual needs are thought through by considering different opportunities and learning preferences. Use of an appropriate “L & D Expert” may be useful here.

3. The Team Manager and the individual meet ahead of the learning activity to briefly review joint expectations from the activity.

4.  The Team Manager and the individual meet after the learning activity to briefly review joint actions following the activity. At this point anticipated costs and benefits can be reviewed against actual.

5. The Team Manager should provide opportunities (where appropriate) for dissemination of information from the learning activity to be communicated from individual to their team.

6.  The Team Manager and the individual continue to review learning outcomes and further needs on both an informal and formal basis.

It is extremely useful to constantly review any performance review process to ensure that it is fit for organisational, team and individual purpose.

Before we finish our IIP journey into TNA, we need to remind ourselves about the importance of the organisation’s training philosophy (perhaps, policy) and how it should reflect how the three sets of needs are prioritised.

This will assist us in making sure that both the validation and evaluation of any learning activities reflect how the organisation values the importance of learning.

For example, the ethos of the organisation might be that the individual is key and that will be the focus for training investment. It may be that the “team is king” and therefore that will be where training spend might be concentrated.

It could be that there is to be substantial change in the organisation and therefore training activities that support that organisational change become imperative.

If you’d like to know more about our work as accredited IIP Specialists, please e-mail alex.gallon@profilehrd.com

A Training Needs Analysis – at Team Level

Following our post, last week, when we identified some of the key thoughts on producing a training needs analysis (TNA) at organisational level, this week we turn to the second of the 3 levels of analysis:

TNA – Team Level  

Our outcome is to engage with our line managers to produce a “team training plan”.

There are two key elements to be considered during this engagement:

1. Ensuring the team managers owns their own plan

2. Ensuring the plan has a process involving team managers in validating and evaluating

The IIP framework offers a staged approach for producing the plan as follows:

1. The team manager determines the team’s training needs from the outcomes of the performance management process (this should be designed to fit the organisation’s purpose and use appropriate measurement criteria).

2. The team manager develops the team training plan together with any specialist L & D/HR support (if available). An initial budget is agreed and resources matched to proposed approaches & methods.

3. The team manager agrees the team’s training priorities with a member of their senior management team to ensure that the plan matches organisational priorities for performance.

4. The team manager then communicates training plan/priorities and budget to the team. The emphasis is on “sharing and learning” as a team

5. The team manager looks to provide opportunities for feedback from key individual learning to the team as a whole.

6. The team manager continues to monitor the validation and evaluation of training activity with his/her team via cost and benefit statements.

Next week, individual training needs analysis.