Does your training matter? (Week 5)

Training Matters1

In Week 1 we set out to define the criteria for what matters to the organisation. This is how we are able to determine whether our training really matters. The four key criteria we identified were:

1. The efficiency of the training function

2. Key performance indicators for the organisation

3. Return on training investment

4. The organisation’s psychological capital

In Weeks 2 & 3, we looked at the actual efficiency of the training function and we offered the key measurement criteria/data from the efficiency of the training function and its potential impact on the organisation’s KPIs.

In Week 4, we looked at the key measures for return on investment for the organisation.

This final week, we look at “Psychological Capital” – the sum of the positive opinion held by people OUTSIDE the organisation. How the organisation is perceived in terms of psychological capital is divided into 3 types:

1 –  as a producer of goods and services (Image? Usefulness of product? Social acceptability of product? etc.)

2 – as an employer (Great place to work?)

3 – as a corporate citizen (Ecological stance? Contributions to Charity? Assistance to region/area/town?)

What are psychological capital measures as a producer of goods & services? Research suggests:

– Quality Awards

– Business Awards

– ISO type Awards

– Brand recognition research & studies

etc.

What are psychological capital measures as an employer? Research suggests:

– Fortune’s “Best companies to work for Index”

– EU Commission’s “Best 100 Employers”

– Investors in People – “Raising the Standard”

– Sunday Times “Top 100 Companies”

etc.

What are psychological capital measures as a corporate citizen? Research suggests:

– Dow Jones

– FTSE Index of socially responsible companies

– Cristian Aid – report on corporate responsibility

etc.

E-mail us or give us a call, make plans to make your training matter.

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Does your training matter? (Week 5)

 Training Matters1

In Week 1 we set out to define the criteria for what matters to the organisation. This is how we are able to determine whether our training really matters. The four key criteria we identified were:

1. The efficiency of the training function

2. Key performance indicators for the organisation

3. Return on training investment

4. The organisation’s psychological capital

In Weeks 2 & 3, we looked at the actual efficiency of the training function and we offered the key measurement criteria/data from the efficiency of the training function and its potential impact on the organisation’s KPIs.

In Week 4, we looked at the key measures for return on investment for the organisation.

This final week, we look at “Psychological Capital” – the sum of the positive opinion held by people OUTSIDE the organisation. How the organisation is perceived in terms of psychological capital is divided into 3 types:

1 –  as a producer of goods and services (Image? Usefulness of product? Social acceptability of product? etc.)

2 – as an employer (Great place to work?)

3 – as a corporate citizen (Ecological stance? Contributions to Charity? Assistance to region/area/town?)

What are psychological capital measures as a producer of goods & services? Research suggests:

– Quality Awards

– Business Awards

– ISO type Awards

– Brand recognition research & studies

etc.

What are psychological capital measures as an employer? Research suggests:

– Fortune’s “Best companies to work for Index”

– EU Commission’s “Best 100 Employers”

– Investors in People – “Raising the Standard”

– Sunday Times “Top 100 Companies”

etc.

What are psychological capital measures as a corporate citizen? Research suggests:

– Dow Jones

– FTSE Index of socially responsible companies

– Cristian Aid – report on corporate responsibility

etc.

E-mail us or give us a call, make plans to make your training matter.

 

 

 

OD Intervention – is there ever a right time?

The choice of strategies and responses adopted by the decision makers to meet the challenges of change are their own.

As we previously mentioned, the role of the OD practitioner (internal or external) is to provide professional services to aid implementation. Neutrality is the first practitioner value, problem analysis the second and being non-prescriptive the third.

Six good reasons why you cannot afford not to start:

My own OD practice has its roots in the Investors in People framework and that has a number of contributions to make to the management of change :

  1. It becomes part of that change, in that it ensures that the “people” issues and implications of change are raised and understood by organisational decision makers.
  2. Its second contribution lies in helping individuals, especially managers, develop their ability to cope with change itself. Personal and team development programmes can be designed to build the coping skills required to live easily with the ambiguity and uncertainty which invariably accompany change.
  3. Its third contribution is in management development to enable managers to fulfil their responsibilities for engaging with and developing their people.
  4. Its fourth contribution can also form part of the management development, but has a wider application. It is simply to provide knowledge and skills in utilising change processes i.e. to overcome the 3 barriers to change, knowing, believing and agreeing.
  5. Its fifth contribution leads out of the fourth, in that specific change will require new knowledge and skills in order for individuals to continue to perform effectively.
  6. The sixth and equally important contribution, is the proper and effective use of the training function to encourage and enable individuals, teams and the organisation to regularly review their current performance.

Whatever strategies and responses are adopted by the decision makers to meet the challenges of change are the decision makers own.

Start the conversations in your organisation, call or e-mail us.

Does your training matter? (Week 4)

Training Matters1

In Week 1 we set out to define the criteria for what matters to the organisation. This is how we are able to determine whether our training really matters. The four key criteria we identified were:

1. The efficiency of the training function

2. Key performance indicators for the organisation

3. Return on training investment

4. The organisation’s psychological capital

In Weeks 2 & 3, we looked at the actual efficiency of the training function and we offered the key measurement criteria/data from the efficiency of the training function and its potential impact on the organisation’s KPIs.

We now turn our attention to return on investment. There are essentially 2 aspects to this:

1. Decide upon at what aspect of learning impact you want to measure i.e. the impact of the learning intervention itself; the impact of the learning back in the learner’s workplace; the impact of any longer term behaviour changes in the learner; the ultimate impact on the business. This decision should be based upon what is manageable and what can be currently used to engage line management.

2. Make a provision in the training budget for doing this, working together with line management.

From a business perspective, it will also be important to keep it simple and this can be achieved via cost and benefit statements, even where the benefits are perceived ones and not necessarily  measurable without getting into some complex calculations.

From an organisational development (OD) perspective, the return on our investment can be measured by careful choosing the most appropriate from:

a) The time people take to achieve a level of competence

b) The proportion of people with a required competence level

c) Customer feedback data

d) Employee engagement data

e) Numbers of people capable/deemed capable of moving into key positions

f) Achievement/movement against performance management criteria

g) People’s reaction to the learning intervention and post learning intervention

h) Cost and benefit statements for specific learning interventions

i) Performance data on HR targets i.e. absence, retention, internal promotions, health & wellbeing etc.

Next week, we consider why psychological capital matters.

 

 

Does your training matter? (Week 3)

 Training Matters1

In Week 1 we set out to define the criteria for what matters to the organisation. This is how we are able to determine whether our training really matters. The four key criteria we identified last week were:

1. The efficiency of the training function

2. Key performance indicators for the organisation

3. Return on training investment

4. The organisation’s psychological capital

In Week 2, we looked at the actual efficiency of the training function.

In week 3 we offer key measurement criteria/data from the efficiency of the training function and its potential impact on the organisation’s KPIs. Again, you choose the criteria in discussions with your top team members :

– revenue/surplus per employee

– profit/surplus per employee

– sales per employee

– achievement of learning & development initiatives that contributed directly to KPIs

– use of data from the performance management process to identify movement in ratings/scores/competencies etc.

– use of data from employee satisfaction surveys of impact of learning & development

– use of data from management evaluation of learning & development initiatives

– data from pre & post learning surveys

– data from talent management surveys

– data from the evaluation of induction and/or leavers

etc.

Next week, we consider return on training investment